Dress Your Slides for Success

If you want to make a positive impact with your presentation slides, you’ll need some great looking images. Since Microsoft retired their built-in online image library, a lot of people might be stranded without any good image resources. Fortunately, there are tons of great websites offering free images. Unfortunately, they’re scattered in a zillion different places all across the web.

Since we like to work smarter instead of harder around here, I’d like to share three free PowerPoint plug-ins that will give you access to first-rate image libraries right inside PowerPoint. No more wasting time jumping between browser tabs looking for just the right photo.

Visit my recent post over on my personal website to get the scoop on these free awesome image libraries and how you can use them without ever leaving PowerPoint.

  1. PickIt:  https://pickit.com/
  2. Pexels:  https://store.office.com/en-us/app.aspx?assetid=WA104379997
  3. Shutterstock: https://www.shutterstock.com/lp/powerpoint-presentation-images-plugin

 

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Using Advanced Gmail Search To Find What You Need

A lot of people use their email as a ginormous repository of information. If you’re one of them you’ll be glad to know that Gmail’s advanced search operators can make it easier for you to find what you’re looking for.

When you have a huge inbox, simply searching basic keywords in the Gmail search isn’t always very helpful. Here are a few tips to help you zero in on exactly what you want.

Let’s say you’re looking for an email that you sent to John with a file attached.You’ll find it quickly using this search:

to:john@myco.com has:attachment

Or maybe you’re looking for all emails from May with .zip files attached.

in:anywhere has:attachment filename:zip before:2016/06/1 after:2016/4/30

Even if you don’t want to remember any of these operators, you can still tap into the power of advanced search by clicking the down arrow in the Gmail search box to access a more user-friendly search form.

TechTip-GmailSearch.gif

Here is a list of helpful Gmail search terms from Google.

Operator Definition Examples
from: Used to specify the sender Example: from:amy
Meaning: Messages from Amy
to: Used to specify a recipient, including “cc:” and “bcc:” fields Example: to:david
Meaning: All messages that were sent to David (by you or someone else)
subject: Search for words in the subject line Example: subject:dinner
Meaning: Messages that have the word “dinner” in the subject
OR Search for messages matching term A or term B*
*OR must be in all caps
Example: from:amy OR from:david
Meaning: Messages from Amy or from David

(hyphen)
Used to exclude messages from your search Example: dinner -movie
Meaning: Messages that contain the word “dinner” but do not contain the word “movie”
label: Search for messages by label Example: from:amy label:friends
Meaning: Messages from Amy that have the label “friends”Example: from:david label:my-family
Meaning: Messages from David that have the label “My Family”
has:
attachment
Search for messages with an attachment Example: from:david has:attachment
Meaning: Messages from David that have an attachment
list: Search for messages on mailing lists Example: list:info@example.com
Meaning: Messages with the words info@example.com in the headers, sent to or from this list
filename: Search for an attachment by name or type Example: filename:physicshomework.txt
Meaning: Messages with an attachment named “physicshomework.txt”Example: label:work filename:pdf
Meaning: Messages labeled “work” that also have a PDF file as an attachment
” “
(quotes)
Used to search for an exact phrase*
*Capitalization isn’t taken into consideration
Example: “i’m feeling lucky”
Meaning: Messages containing the phrase “i’m feeling lucky” or “I’m feeling lucky”Example: subject:”dinner and a movie”
Meaning: Messages containing the phrase “dinner and a movie” in the subject
( ) Used to group words
Used to specify terms that shouldn’t be excluded
Example: from:amy (dinner OR movie)
Meaning: Messages from Amy that contain either the word “dinner” or the word “movie”Example: subject:(dinner movie)
Meaning: Messages in which the subject contains both the word “dinner” and the word “movie”
in:anywhere Search for messages anywhere in Gmail*
*Messages in Spam and Trashare excluded from searches by default
Example: in:anywhere movie
Meaning: Messages in All Mail, Spam, andTrash that contain the word “movie”
in:inbox
in:trash
in:spam
Search for messages in Inbox,Trash, or Spam Example: in:trash from:amy
Meaning: Messages from Amy that are inTrash
is:important
label:important
Search within messages thatPriority Inbox considers important. Example: is:important from:janet
Meaning: Messages from Janet that were marked as important by Priority Inbox
is:starred
is:unread
is:read
Search for messages that are starred, unread, or read Example: is:read is:starred from:David
Meaning: Messages from David that have been read and are marked with a star
has:yellow-star
has:red-star
has:orange-star
has:green-star
has:blue-star
has:purple-star
has:red-bang
has:orange-guillemet
has:yellow-bang
has:green-check
has:blue-info
has:purple-question
Search for messages with a particular star Example: has:purple-star from:David
Meaning: Messages from David that are marked with a purple star
cc:
bcc:
Used to specify recipients in thecc: or bcc: fields*
*Search on bcc: cannot retrieve messages on which you were blind carbon copied
Example: cc:david
Meaning: Messages that were cc-ed to David
after:
before:
older:
newer:
Search for messages sent or received during a certain period of time
(using the date format yyyy/mm/dd)
Example: after:2004/04/16 before:2004/04/18
Meaning: Messages sent between April 16, 2004 and April 18, 2004.*
*More precisely: Messages sent after 12:00 AM (or 00:00) April 16, 2004 and before April 18, 2004.
older_than
newer_than
Similar to older and newer, but allows relative dates using d, m, and y for day, month, and year Example: newer_than:2d
Meaning: Finds messages sent within the last two days.
is:chat Search for chat messages Example: is:chat monkey
Meaning: Any chat message including the word “monkey.”
deliveredto: Search for messages within a particular email address in the Delivered-To line of the message header Example: deliveredto:username@gmail.com
Meaning: Any message with username@gmail.com in the Delivered-To: field of the message header (which can help you find messages forwarded from another account or ones sent to an alias).
circle: Search for messages that were sent from someone who you added to a particular Google+ circle Example: circle:friends
Meaning: Any message that was sent by a person in your “Friends” circle.Examples: circle:”soccer friends (team blue)” or circle:”my \”fab four\””
Notes: For circle names that include a space, parentheses, curly brackets, or vertical bar, add quotes around the name. For names that include quotes, add a back slash immediately before the quotes.
has:circle Search for all messages that were sent from someone who you added to your Google+ circles Example: has:circle
Meaning: Any message that was sent by a person in any of your circles.
category: Search for messages within a category Example: category:updates
Meaning: All messages in the Updates category.Example: category:social Mindy
Meaning: Messages in the Social category that include “Mindy.”
size: Search for messages larger than the specified size in bytes Example: size:1000000
Meaning: All messages larger than 1MB (1,000,000 bytes) in size.
larger:
smaller:
Similar to size: but allows abbreviations for numbers Example: larger:10M
Meaning: All messages of at least 10M bytes (10,000,000 bytes) in size.
+
(plus sign)
Match the search term exactly Example: +unicorn
Meaning: Finds messages containing “unicorn” but not “unicorns” or “unciorn”
rfc822msgid: Find a message by the message-id header Example:rfc822msgid:200503292@example.com
Meaning: Locates the exact message with the specified SMTP message-id. Learn more about headers.
has:userlabels
has:nouserlabels
Search for messages that have and have not had labels that you created applied to them.
NOTE: Gmail applies labels to individual messages, not to conversation threads.
Example: has:nouserlabels
Meaning: Finds all messages without any of your own labels (excludes automatic labels like inbox, spam, and trash). Since Gmail applies labels to individual messages, you might see results that appear to have labels; in this case, another message in the same conversation thread has had a label applied to it.

Stay Safe With LastPass Auto-Change

No doubt, you know that you’re supposed to change your passwords every so often to keep them secure. Nobody I know EVER does this. Maybe we’re all lazy, but the mere thought of changing the bazillion passwords I have makes my head hurt!!!

Enter the LastPass Auto-change passwords feature.

auto-change-password-in-progress

 

How It Works

For LastPass, click on the extension icon in your browser and select My LastPass Vault from the drop-down menu. Choose the account you’d like to change and select the wrench icon. Then in the pop-up window that appears, select Auto Change Password and the process begins.

Granted, it doesn’t work with every website out there, but automating password updates many of the popular sites you use probably makes it worthwhile.

If you’re not using LastPass already, grab the Chrome extension and let Lastpass generate secure passwords for you anytime you need one.

Managing Passwords in Chrome

If you use Google Chrome as your web browser (and you should) you probably know that it can save your usernames and passwords for sites that you visit. But did you also know that Chrome can sync these passwords across all your devices?

Imagine you’ve created an account on your computer at work but want to sign-in from home or even from your smartphone while you’re out and about. This is definitely easiest if you’re using the Chrome browser and signing in with your Google account on all your devices.  Fortunately, you can access all your information from any browser simply by visiting passwords.google.com

ChromePasswords

 

Just sign-in with your Google account, to access a list of all the accounts and passwords you’ve used in Chrome.

You can display the passwords by clicking the eye icon or remove any of the entries aren’t able to change your existing passwords. (You’ll have to visit the associate website to do that.)

If you don’t want your passwords stored in the Google Passwords site, you have two options. Don’t save your passwords in Chrome at all or make them unavailable from the Google website.

  1. Open Chrome and go to Settings – Advanced Sync Settings.
    ( Or enter chrome://settings/syncSetup in the address bar )
  2. Under the Encryption Options, choose “Encrypt all synced data with your own sync passphrase”, enter a passphrase and save the settings.

Disable Google Passwords

Shortly afterwards your passwords will not be accessible via the Google Passwords site. You can always change your mind revert back to the default settings..

Rock Your Docs With these Google Docs Tricks

Over the past few years, I’ve shifted almost all of my document creation tasks from Word to Google Docs. Mainly for the sharing and collaboration features and the fact that I can access my documents from anywhere.

At first, I really missed some of the ‘power’ features of Word but now that I’ve found some of these great tricks in Google Docs I’m a  pretty happy camper.

1. Templates

This is something most people don’t realize is in Google Docs. Sometimes I forget myself. Fortunately, a recent update puts these right at the top of the page when you get into Google Docs.

Templates

2. Automatic Table of Contents

Just like Word, Docs has styles (Heading 1, Heading 2, etc) which allows you to do several cool, time-saving things including automatically generating a table of content.

If you’ve already applied styles, it couldn’t be any easier. Go to Insert » Table of Contents.

TOC

3. Document Navigation

If you’re navigating longer documents, head over and grab the “Table of Contents” add-in  and you’ll get an automatic navigation sidebar.  (Not to be confused with the TOC we made above. ) You can get this and other useful add-ons via the Add-ons menu.

TOCnavigation-addon

Easier Pit Stops With Google Maps

Do you ever need to make stops along your route for things like gas , food, coffee or restaurants? Of course, you do! Now you can easily search for gas stations, grocery stores, coffee shops, etc in Google Maps  while still in navigation mode, and add them as a detour on the way to your final destination.

To access this new feature make sure you’ve got the latest update, then:

  1. Tap on a magnifying glass icon that appears at the top-right corner of the screen in navigation mode.
  2. From there, a drop-down menu will appear offering several options, including gas stations, restaurants, grocery stores, and coffee shops. You can also “search for more places” if you’re looking for other businesses or addresses.

You can also do this with the voice command by tapping on the microphone button.

This may not seem like much, but if you’ve ever actually tried doing this you’ll appreciate how much nicer it is now. Plus, in the next “few weeks” Google says they’ll add the ability to check gas prices at the stations you find along your way.

“Read It Later” Options

How many times a day do you find something online that you don’t have time to read but definitely want to come back to it later? For me, that happens quite often and fortunately,  there are a number of ways  you can keep track of those “Read It Later” items. (And none of them involve sticky notes or ribbons around your finger!)

Here are a few apps that will help you keep track of all those things you can’t get to now, but you want to keep track of for later when you can.

These apps have different features, but in a nutshell they save pages in a central location so you can easily find them later.

Pocket

This is the one I use, with a simple bookmarklet that lets me save a page with a single click. (Available for Web, Mac, Chrome App, iOS, Android, Kindle)

https://getpocket.com

Pocket

Instapaper

This one is like creating an online newspaper of things you want to circle back to. (Available for Web, iOS, Android, Kindle)

https://www.instapaper.com

Instapaper

Readability

Readability turns any web page into a clean view for reading now or later on your computer, smartphone, or tablet. You can also follow people to see what they are marking to read later. (Available for Web, iOS, Android with lots of integrations with other apps.)

Readability

https://www.readability.com/

Evernote Clearly

If you’re already an Evernote user (which we’ve covered before), you might want to check out this one. Clearly makes blog posts, articles and webpages clean and easy to read. You can easily save them to Evernote to read them anytime, anywhere.

Evernote Clearly

https://evernote.com/clearly/